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North American Animals - mamals, birds, reptiles, insects

 Golden northern bumble bee (Bombus fervidus)




Golden northern bumble bee | Bombus fervidus photo
Bombus fervidus (Golden Northern Bumble Bee) feeding on thyme at the Penn State Lebanon County Extension office.

Photograph by John Baker. Some rights reserved.  (view image details)

GOLDEN NORTHERN BUMBLE BEE FACTS

Description
The Golden northern bumble bee, native to North America, is a stout bee with black head and yellow body. Females are larger than males, and males are more brightly colored. The legs are black and the wings are dark and semi transparent. Golden northern bumblebees collect pollen from flowering plants and turn it into honey by chewing it. These bees help with pollination of plants. Bumble bees can sting and do not lose their stinger after attacking, like honey bees, and can therefore sting more than once.

Size
males grow to about 14mm, females are larger and grow to about 20mm

Environment
found in woodland clearings, parks, gardens and roadsides

Food
adult bees feed on nectar, larvae feed on honey

Breeding
The queen bee lays eggs into cells in the nest. They build a nest from grass which is added to house the colony. The larvae feed on honey produced by the queen and pupate before emerging as adult bees.

Range
Bombus fervidus is found in northern United States, and is most common in the north east.

Classification
Class:Insecta
Order:Hymenoptera
Family:Apidae
Genus:Bombus
Species:fervidus
Common Name:Golden northern bumble bee


Relatives in same Genus
  Hunt's Bumble bee (B. huntii)
  Common Eastern Bumble Bee (B. impatiens)
  Nevada Bumblebee (B. nevadensis)
  Tricoloured Bumble Bee (B. ternarius)