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North American Animals - mamals, birds, reptiles, insects

 American Badger (Taxidea taxus)




American Badger | Taxidea taxus photo
American Badger photographed in Mohave County, Arizona

Photograph by Patrick Dockens. Some rights reserved.  (view image details)

American Badger | Taxidea taxus photo
American Badger

Photograph by U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service. License: Public Domain.  (view image details)

AMERICAN BADGER FACTS

Description
The American Badger has a flattened body with short and stocky legs. The fur on the back and sides is grayish or reddish. The underside is a buff color. The throat and chin are whitish, and the face has black patches. Their is a white stripe from the nose over the back over the head. In northern populations the white stripe ends at the shoulders. In southern populations the stripe goes right down the back to the rump. Males are significantly larger than females. They are about the size of a medium-sized dog. They are powerful diggers and dig up rodents for food.

Other Names
Blaireau

Size
Total length 52cm - 87cm. Tail length: 10cm - 15cm. Weight: 4kg - 12kg

Environment
open grasslands, fields, and pastures

Food
They dig out and eat ground squirrels and pocket gophers. Also eat frogs, birds, snakes, insects, worms.

Breeding
A litter of 1 - 5 (average 3) is born after a total gestation of about 7 months. The young are born in a grass-lined den, and are born blind and helpless with a thin coat of fur. The eyes open at 4 -6 weeks. The young are weaned after 2 - 3 months

Range
Badgers are found through the central western Canadian provinces, and throughout the western United States, and down into the mountainous areas of Mexico.

Classification
Class:Mammalia
Order:Carnivora
Family:Mustelidae
Genus:Taxidea
Species:taxus
Common Name:American Badger