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North American Animals - mamals, birds, reptiles, insects

 Ringtail (Bassariscus astutus)




Ringtail | Bassariscus astutus photo
Ringtail.

Photograph by USDA Forest Service. License: Public Domain.  (view image details)

RINGTAIL FACTS

Description
The Ringtail has a cat-like body and face like a fox with big ears. It has brownish fur above, pale buff underparts and a bushy tail with black and white rings. The eyes have black or dark brown rings round them. Ringtails are most active at night when they come out to forage for food.

Size
Head and body length is 30cm - 42cm. Tail length is 311cm - 44cm

Environment
Ringtails prefer areas with rocky outcrops and crevices in semi-arid country, deserts, woodlands and conifer forests.

Food
Ringtails eat rodents, rabbits, squirrels, insects, birds, small reptiles. They also eat some fruit, nuts and berries.

Breeding
The female makes a nest in a tree. Two to seven young are born after gestation of about 77 days. The young are weaned after 4 months. The mother and young join the group after 5 months.

Range
southwestern Oregon and eastern Kansas south through California, southern Nevada, Utah, Colorado, Arizona, New Mexico, Texas and northern Mexico.

Classification
Class:Mammalia
Order:Carnivora
Family:Procyonidae
Genus:Bassariscus
Species:astutus
Common Name:Ringtail


Relatives in same Genus
  Cacomistle (B. sumichrasti)