Wildlife North America . com
North American Animals - mamals, birds, reptiles, insects

 Bolson Tortoise (Gopherus flavomarginatus)




Bolson Tortoise | Gopherus flavomarginatus photo
Bolson tortoise in Mexico

Photograph by Mbtrap. Some rights reserved.  (view image details)

BOLSON TORTOISE FACTS

Description
The Bolson Tortoise is the largest North American tortoise species. It was discovered as recently as 1959. The Bolson Tortoise is a terrestrial tortoise with a high-domed brownish carapace. The front legs have heavy claws and are flattened for digging. The back legs are stumpy. Males are slightly larger than females. Male tortoises have a concave plastron, while females have a flat plastron. The scutes often have grooved concentric rings. The head is small and rounded. The tail is of short.

Other Names
Mexican Giant Tortoise, Yellow-margined Tortoise, Mexican Gopher Tortoise

Size
carapace length to about 46cm

Environment
Bolton Tortoises live in colonies of up to 100. They feed during the early morning and evening. They hide in burrows during the heat of the day. They dig burrows in the sand with their forelimbs. In winter, they hibernate in their burrows.

Food
Bolson tortoises feed mainly on wiry Tobosa bunch grass

Breeding
Mexican Bolson tortoise lay 12 to 15 eggs. Bolton Tortoise lifespan has been estimated at up to 80 to 100 years,

Range
The Bolson Tortoise is found in the Chihuahuan Desert in north-central Mexico.

Conservation Status
The conservation status in the 2004 IUCN Red List of Threatened Animals is "vulnerable".

Classification
Class:Reptilia
Order:Testudines
Family:Testudinidae
Genus:Gopherus
Species:flavomarginatus
Common Name:Bolson Tortoise


Relatives in same Genus
  Desert Tortoise (G. agassizii)