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 Buttermilk Racer (Coluber constrictor anthicus)




Buttermilk Racer | Coluber constrictor-anthicus photo
Buttermilk Racer

Photograph by Dawson. Some rights reserved.  (view image details)

BUTTERMILK RACER FACTS

Description
The Buttermilk Racer is a thin bodied snake. The body is usually black or gray (sometimes almost green or blue) mottled with white or yellow spots. The amount of white spots is variable and some snakes look white with gray spots. The underside is white or cream. Young snakes are light tan with brown saddle-shaped spots on the back. Racers are active during the day, and are fast moving.

Size
length to 150cm

Environment
woodland, deciduous forest, coniferous forest

Food
rodents, lizards, frogs. Young snakes also eat insects

Breeding
Females lay 6 to 25 eggs. The young snakes hatch in late summer.

Range
southern Arkansas, Louisiana, and southern and eastern Texas.

Notes
The Buttermilk Racer is non-venomous and not dangerous to humans. They are fairly nervous and may bite if handled. They release a foul-smelling scent to deter predators and if caught, thrash around trying to escape. They can be kept in captivity, but their behavior makes them a bit difficult to look after

Classification
Class:Reptilia
Order:Squamata (Serpentes)
Family:Colubridae
Genus:Coluber
Species:constrictor anthicus
Common Name:Buttermilk Racer


Relatives in same Genus
  Eastern Yellow-belly Racer (C. constrictor flaviventris)
  Blue Racer (C. constrictor foxi)
  Black Racer (C. constrictor priapus)