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 Texas Blind Snake (Leptotyphlops dulcis dulcis)




Texas Blind Snake | Leptotyphlops dulcis-dulcis photo
Photograph by LA Dawson. Some rights reserved.  (view image details)

TEXAS BLIND SNAKE FACTS

Description
The Texas Blind Snake looks like a shiny earthworm. They are pink or brown and have a segmented appearance. The eyes are two dark spots under the head scales, and the mouth is very small. Blind snakes are often seen after spring rains and are often mistaken for earthworms. When handled they squirm around and try to distract the threat by "stabbing" harmlessly with the tip of their tail.

Other Names
Texas Slender Blind Snake, Texas Threadsnake

Size
length 20cm. Body width is only about 5 mm

Environment
Texas Blind Snakes spend most of their life buried in loose soil. They only come out to feed or when rain floods their habitat.

Food
eats mainly termite and ant larvae.

Breeding
Lays eggs.

Range
south western Kansas, western Oklahoma, central Texas, southern New Mexico, south eastern Arizona. In northern Mexico it is found in Chihuahua, Coahuila, Tamaulipas, Nuevo León, San Luis Potosí, Veracruz, Querétaro, Hidalgo and Puebla.

Notes
They are harmless to humans. Their mouth is too small to give a significant bite.

Classification
Class:Reptilia
Order:Squamata (Serpentes)
Family:Leptotyphlopidae
Genus:Leptotyphlops
Species:dulcis dulcis
Common Name:Texas Blind Snake