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North American Animals - mamals, birds, reptiles, insects

 Texas Indigo Snake (Drymarchon corais erebennus)




Texas Indigo Snake | Drymarchon corais-erebennus photo
Texas Indigo Snake

Photograph by LA Dawson. Some rights reserved.  (view image details)

TEXAS INDIGO SNAKE FACTS

Description
The Texas Indigo Snake is mainly black with shiny iridescent scales. The underside is gray or may be a salmon pink color. The chin and sides of the head are reddish-brown. The Indigo Snake is active during the day and forages for anything small enough to eat including other large snakes.

Size
about 1.8m, although grow to 2.4m long

Environment
The Texas Indigo snake is found in grassland, coastal sand dunes, lightly vegetated areas near permanent water, Shelters in burrows

Food
eats small mammals, birds, lizards, frogs, turtles, eggs, other snakes

Breeding
Clutches that average 10-12 eggs are laid in spring. They hatch after about 80 days. Hatchlings are up to 65cm long.

Range
southern Texas, and south into Mexico as far Veracruz.

Notes
The Texas Indigo Snake is non-venomous and not usually aggressive, but may bite vigorously and release a foul smelling musk from its rear if handled.

Classification
Class:Reptilia
Order:Squamata (Serpentes)
Family:Colubridae
Genus:Drymarchon
Species:corais erebennus
Common Name:Texas Indigo Snake


Relatives in same Genus
  Eastern Indigo Snake (D. corais couperi)