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North American Animals - mamals, birds, reptiles, insects

 Western Blind Snake (Leptotyphlops humilis)




Western Blind Snake | Leptotyphlops humilis photo
Western Blind Snake

Photograph by NPS, http://www.nps.gov/tont/nature. License: Public Domain.  (view image details)

WESTERN BLIND SNAKE FACTS

Description
The Western Blind Snake looks like a long earthworm. It is pink, purple, or silvery-brown and blunt at both ends. The eyes are reduced to light sensitive black spots. The skull is thick for burrowing. There is a spine at the end of its tail. When threatened, they writhe around, and excrete strong smelling fluid.

Other Names
Western Slender Blind Snake, Western Threadsnake

Size
to 30cm

Environment
lives in loose soil in deserts, rocky hillsides and scrub. Lives underground. Invades ant and termite nests.

Food
insects, insect larvae and eggs

Breeding
Lays eggs July - August. Females look after the eggs. Sometimes share a communal nest.

Range
Found in south Texas west southern and central Arizona, southern Nevada, south western Utah, southern California and northern Mexico.

Notes
They are harmless to humans. Their mouth is too small to give a significant bite.

Classification
Class:Reptilia
Order:Squamata (Serpentes)
Family:Leptotyphlopidae
Genus:Leptotyphlops
Species:humilis
Common Name:Western Blind Snake


Relatives in same Genus
  Texas Blind Snake (L. dulcis dulcis)