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North American Animals - mamals, birds, reptiles, insects

 Western Coachwhip (Masticophis flagellum testaceus)




Western Coachwhip | Masticophis flagellum-testaceus photo
Coachwhip. Sawdust Ranch near Somerville, Texas.

Photograph by Clinton & Charles Robertson. Some rights reserved.  (view image details)

Western Coachwhip | Masticophis flagellum-testaceus photo
Coachwhip. Sawdust Ranch near Somerville, Texas.

Photograph by Clinton & Charles Robertson. Some rights reserved.  (view image details)

Western Coachwhip | Masticophis flagellum-testaceus photo
Western Coachwhip, Masticophis flagellum testaceus

Photograph by Dawson. Some rights reserved.  (view image details)

WESTERN COACHWHIP FACTS

Description
The Western Coachwhip is variable in color and can be tan, brown, yellow, or pink. They sometimes have slightly darker bands. The snake is slender with a thin tail. The underside is pink. The eyes are large with round pupils.

Size
length to 200cm

Environment
open areas in desert, grassland, scrub, rocky ground. Rests in rodent burrows or amongst rocks, logs

Food
Eats small mammals, birds, bird eggs, lizards, snakes, amphibians, and carrion

Breeding
Coachwhips are oviparous. Lays eggs in early summer. Eggs hatch in 45 - 70 days.

Range
found across Texas, Arizona, New Mexico, Colorado, California and much of Mexico

Notes
Coachwhips are non-venomous. They can be nervous snakes and will vibrate their tail and strike when threatened, although they will flee if given the opportunity.

Classification
Class:Reptilia
Order:Squamata (Serpentes)
Family:Colubridae
Genus:Masticophis
Species:flagellum testaceus
Common Name:Western Coachwhip


Relatives in same Genus
  Red Coachwhip (M. flagellum piceus)
  Schott's Whipsnake (M. schotti schotti)