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North American Animals - mamals, birds, reptiles, insects

 Western Hognose Snake (Heterodon nasicus)




Western Hognose Snake | Heterodon nasicus photo
Western Hognose Snake

Photograph by Gary M Stolz, U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service. License: Public Domain.  (view image details)

Western Hognose Snake | Heterodon nasicus photo
Western Hognose Snake

Photograph by LA Dawson. Some rights reserved.  (view image details)

WESTERN HOGNOSE SNAKE FACTS

Description
The Western Hognose Snake is light brown with dark brown or gray blotches. The underside often has a black and white checkered pattern, sometimes with some orange. They are stocky snakes with an upturned snout which they use for digging in the soil.

Other Names
Blowing Adder, Blowing Viper, Prairie Hog-nosed Snake, Plains Hognose Snake

Size
can grow from 40cm - 85cm long. Females are generally larger than males.

Environment
shortgrass prairies, grasslands, and rocky, semi-arid regions.

Food
amphibians, lizards, and rodents.

Breeding
They breed in the spring. Oviparous, with females laying 4 - 23 eggs from June to August. Eggs hatch after approximately 60 days. Hatchlings are 15-19 cm in length,

Range
Found from southern Alberta and Manitoba in Canada, to Arizona and Texas in the United States, as far as northern Mexico.

Notes
The Hognose Snake is not considered dangerous to humans. It is a docile snake, and does not bite in defense. It may hiss and make mock strikes if harassed, and may play dead. The Western Hognose is commonly kept in captivity as a reptile pet. It is fairly hardy and its docile nature makes it a good choice for a pet snake. They are bred in captivity and some color variations are being produced including high red, high orange, and albinos.

Classification
Class:Reptilia
Order:Squamata (Serpentes)
Family:Colubridae
Genus:Heterodon
Species:nasicus
Common Name:Western Hognose Snake


Relatives in same Genus
  Eastern Hognose Snake (H. platirhinos)