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North American Animals - mamals, birds, reptiles, insects

 Western Ringneck Snake (Diadophis punctatus)




Western Ringneck Snake | Diadophis punctatus photo
Western Ringneck Snake - not sure what subspecies this is ??

Photograph by Chris Brown. License: Public Domain.  (view image details)

WESTERN RINGNECK SNAKE FACTS

Description
The Western Ringneck Snake is a small, slender snake. The body is olive, brownish, blue-grey or green on top with a yellow or orange neck band. The underside is yellow-orange, becoming coral towards the tail with conspicuous black spots often forming rows. The head is dark. Juveniles are similar to adults with darker color above. The male has tubercles on the scales above the vent.

Other Names
Northwestern Ring-necked Snake

Size
length 26-41 cm

Environment
wet meadows, rocky hillsides, farmland, grassland, coniferous forests, mixed woodlands. Usually found under rocks, logs, bark

Food
The Western Ringneck Snake eats salamanders, tadpoles, small frogs, small snakes, lizards, worms, slugs, and insects.

Breeding
Mating occurs throughout the warmer months, with 3 to 10 eggs being laid at a time in a moist, protected area, sometimes in a communal nest with the eggs of several other females.

Range
Found in Oregon, southern Washington, parts of Idaho, northern California coast

Notes
The Ringneck Snake is a gentle species that is easily handled. It often coils its tail into a corkscrew shape.

Classification
Class:Reptilia
Order:Squamata (Serpentes)
Family:Colubridae
Genus:Diadophis
Species:punctatus
Common Name:Western Ringneck Snake


Relatives in same Genus
  Northern Ringneck Snake (D. punctatus edwardsii)
  Regal Ringneck Snake (D. punctatus regalis)