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Bowhead Whale
Bowhead Whale (Balaena mysticetus)
The Bowhead is a large rotund whale with similar appearance to the Right Whale. The jaw line is extremely arched giving it the common name of "bowhead". The body is mainly black with lower jaw and chin marked with... Read more >
Northern Minke Whale
Northern Minke Whale (Balaenoptera acutorostrata)
The Minke Whale is a small rorqual with a pointed head and relatively small rostrum (snout). The body is dark with paler grey on the lower flanks and underside. There are usually pale chevron markings behind the head.... Read more >




Sei Whale
Sei Whale (Balaenoptera borealis)
Sei whales are dark gray with irregular white markings across the back. The body is relatively slender with short pectoral fins and sickle shaped dorsal fin. The snout is pointed. On the underside of throat and chest is... Read more >
Bryde's Whale
Bryde's Whale (Balaenoptera edeni)
Bryde's Whale is dark gray with a yellowish white underside. It is the second smallest rorqual (after the Northern Minke Whale). It has three parallel ridges in the area between the blowholes and the tip of the head.... Read more >
Blue Whale
Blue Whale (Balaenoptera musculus)
Blue whales are grayish blue mottled with lighter spots. The underside often is yellowish, due to growth of microorganisms, giving the belly a yellowish tinge. The back and sides are usually mottled with patterns that... Read more >
Fin Whale
Fin Whale (Balaenoptera physalus)
The Fin Whale is a streamlined rorqual with similar body shape to the Blue Whale. It is the second largest rorqual after the Blue Whale. The body is brownish grey above and white below. The lower jaw is white on the... Read more >
North Atlantic Right Whale
North Atlantic Right Whale (Eubalaena glacialis)
The North Atlantic Right Whale is dark colored with a large rotund body and no dorsal fin. It has prominent callosities on the rostrum (snout), near blowholes, near eyes, and on the chin and lower lip. Callosities are... Read more >
North Pacific Right Whale
North Pacific Right Whale (Eubalaena japonica)
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Humpback Whale
Humpback Whale (Megaptera novaeangliae)
The Humpback Whale has a dark grey or black body, with white markings on its underside. The black and white markings are unique and can be used to identify individual animals. They have long pectoral fins with bumps on... Read more >
Beluga
Beluga (Delphinapterus leucas)
The Beluga is the only species of whale that is completely white. Calves are born gray and become whiter with age. They have no dorsal fin, but have a low ridge along their back. The flippers are short. The head is... Read more >
Narwhal
Narwhal (Monodon monocerus)
Adult Narwhals are brown or dark gray above with whitish underside. The body has mottled pattern of spots. The head is small with blunt snout. The flippers are short and rounded and there is no dorsal fin. Narwhals have... Read more >
Gray Whale
Gray Whale (Eschrichtius robustus)
The Gray Whale is dark gray in color. Scattered patches of barnacles and orange whale lice grow on the skin. These parasites leave greyish white scar marks when they drop off. It has two to five shallow furrows on the... Read more >
Northern Bottlenosed Whale
Northern Bottlenosed Whale (Hyperoodon ampullatus)
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Pygmy Sperm Whale
Pygmy Sperm Whale (Kogia breviceps)
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Sperm Whale
Sperm Whale (Physeter catodon)
The Sperm Whale is a toothed whale with a huge box-shaped head. The head is about a third of the total body length, and contains the largest brain of any mammal - the brain weighs in at about 9kg. Sperm Whales can dive... Read more >
West Indian Manatee
West Indian Manatee (Trichechus manatus)
Adult Manatees are grey or brown. The newborn calves are darker, becoming lighter after about one month. They have seal-shaped body with very little body hair. They never leave the water, Read more >










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